So i dressed up nice for work today- flower in my hair, lace collar, blouse- so i feel pretty. Normally, i wear jeans and a hoodie- im not sloppy, but i wear clothes that i wont mind if they get dirty.

A regular saw me and made a comment to my coworker, ’ i didnt think she was that kind of girl` `does she wear that when shes not working` and finally `is she trying to get someones attention`

He asked me why i dont wear nice clothes to work and i had to explain that nice clothes would get ruined on a normal day. He said that my job didnt all for any physical labor. I said that i have to move stock, climb ladders, lift heavy guns- none of which phased him. In his words, i could just look pretty at work and not do anything.

This is why I hate dressing nice at work. I hate answering for my appearance. I hate having to explain why I don’t wear a dress every day. I hate feeling like I have to apologize when not done up- like my body is their property.

Ugh.

happydragonbreathesrainbows:

japhers:

silly comic with vampires and their human make-up artist friends

THIS IS SO CUTE

(via chantersboard)

blunk182:

DATING TIP: Hold the door for your date. Rip the door off its hinges. Use the door as a weapon to fight off other men. Establish dominance.

(via clemmycloo)

emilywarrenart:

My section for the beautiful Yaoi Hands anthology zine. More info here

(via pique-nique)

(via wizardick)

theweniswarmer:

It’s Time
A mix of classic, retro, and different Halloween Songs
This is Halloween - Nightmare Before Christmas Soundtrack
Monster Mash - Selebrities
Day of the Dead - Voltaire
Thriller - Michael Jackson
It’s Terror Time Again - Scooby Doo on Zombie Island
Brains! - Voltaire
Ghost Busters Theme - Ray Parker Jr.
Feed Me (Git it) - Little Shop of Horrors
Grim Grinning Ghosts - Disney’s Haunted Mansion
The Greatest Show Unearthed - Creature Feature
Time Warp - Rocky Horror Picture Show
Oogie Boogie - The Nightmare Before Christmas
Friends on the Other Side - Disney’s The Princess and The Frog
Worst Pies in London - Sweeney Tod
I Put a Spell on You - Hocus Pocus Soundtrack
Dinner with Drac - John “The Cool Ghoul” Zacherle
The Devil Went Down to Georgia - Charlie Daniels Band
Welcome to My Nightmare - Alice Cooper
The Headless Horseman - Disney’s Ichabod & Mr. Toad
Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) - David Bowie
The Addam’s Family Song - The Addam’s Family Soundtrack
Witch Doctor - Peter Pan Records
Grave Robber at Large - Creature Feature
Spooky Scary Skeletons - TheLivingTombstone mix

LISTEN HERE (X)

theweniswarmer:

It’s Time

A mix of classic, retro, and different Halloween Songs

  1. This is Halloween - Nightmare Before Christmas Soundtrack
  2. Monster Mash - Selebrities
  3. Day of the Dead - Voltaire
  4. Thriller - Michael Jackson
  5. It’s Terror Time Again - Scooby Doo on Zombie Island
  6. Brains! - Voltaire
  7. Ghost Busters Theme - Ray Parker Jr.
  8. Feed Me (Git it) - Little Shop of Horrors
  9. Grim Grinning Ghosts - Disney’s Haunted Mansion
  10. The Greatest Show Unearthed - Creature Feature
  11. Time Warp - Rocky Horror Picture Show
  12. Oogie Boogie - The Nightmare Before Christmas
  13. Friends on the Other Side - Disney’s The Princess and The Frog
  14. Worst Pies in London - Sweeney Tod
  15. I Put a Spell on You - Hocus Pocus Soundtrack
  16. Dinner with Drac - John “The Cool Ghoul” Zacherle
  17. The Devil Went Down to Georgia - Charlie Daniels Band
  18. Welcome to My Nightmare - Alice Cooper
  19. The Headless Horseman - Disney’s Ichabod & Mr. Toad
  20. Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) - David Bowie
  21. The Addam’s Family Song - The Addam’s Family Soundtrack
  22. Witch Doctor - Peter Pan Records
  23. Grave Robber at Large - Creature Feature
  24. Spooky Scary Skeletons - TheLivingTombstone mix

LISTEN HERE (X)

(via papadaftpunk)

adventuretime:

archiemcphee:

Simply watching Adventure Time is often enough to make us hungry for sweets, but now we have an actual edible Candy Kingdom to tantalize our tastebuds. This mouthwateringly awesome Gingerbread Candy Kingdom was made by Redditor IHaveAFluffyCat (who actually does have an adorable fluffy cat).

The amount of time, effort, and candy that went into this work of edible art is amazing. It’s beautifully detailed from top to bottom, but we’re particularly impressed by the Gumball Guardians, whose sugar glass heads contain real gumballs.

Click here to see a complete gallery of step-by-step process photos.

[via Reddit]

A Gingerbread Candy Kingdom???

ARAHRRGHGAHGRHRGLHGAHLLLAAA

(via insanewardog)

art-of-swords:

[ NEWS ] Scholars confirm first discovery of Japanese sword from master bladesmith Masamune in 150 years
by Casey Baseel
Should you visit a history museum in Japan, and, like I do, make an immediate beeline for the collections of samurai armor and weaponry, you might be surprised to notice that Japanese swords are customarily displayed with the stitching removed from the hilt. Visually, it sort of dampens the impact, since the remaining skinny slab of metal is a lot less evocative of it actually being gripped and wielded by one of Japan’s warriors of ages past.
The reason this is done, though, is because many Japanese swordsmiths would “sign” their works by etching their names into the metal of the hilt. Some craftsmen achieved almost legendary status, becoming folk heroes whose names are widely known even today.
The most respected of all, though, was Masamune, whose reluctance to sign his blades has made identifying them difficult. But difficult and impossible are two different things, and for the first time in over a century, a sword has been confirmed by historians as being the creation of the master himself.
Masamune was active during the late 13th and early 14th centuries, the part of Japan that today is part of Kanagawa Prefecture. He lived his life during the Kamakura Period, when the samurai class saw the most dramatic rise in its power over Japan.
Producing the highest-quality blades during a time of military power made Masamune’s swords extremely prized. Today, the only swordsmith who can approach his exalted historical status is Muramasa, who was born hundreds of years later. Justified or not, Muramasa is said to have been psychologically imbalanced and prone to violence. Superstition holds that these traits were passed on to the swords he forged, and as such Masamune’s are often held to be the superior weapons.
However, it can be hard to keep track of weapons in a country that’s gone through as many civil wars, revolutions, and occupations as Japan has, no matter how impressive their pedigree. Last year, a man brought a sword, which had found its way into his personal property, to the Kyoto National Museum to be appraised. Historian and sword scholar Taeko Watanabe spent the months between then and now studying the blade, and has recently announce her conclusion that it is a Masamune.
"Judging from its unique characteristics such as the pattern that can be seen in the side of the blade… it was unmistakably forged by Masamune."
The particular sword, which Watanabe says is called the Shimazu Masamune, had been given in 1862 by Iemochi, the 14th Tokugawa shogun, to the Imperial Family to mark his marriage to Princess Kazunomiya, also known as Princess Kazu.
"By presenting such a masterwork to the Imperial Family, Iemochi showed the deepest appreciation and highest respect," Watanabe commented.
Following this, the sword’s whereabouts were unknown until its anonymous owner brought it to the museum in Kyoto. It is the first blade to be confirmed as a Masamune in roughly 150 years.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Rocket News 24

art-of-swords:

[ NEWS ] Scholars confirm first discovery of Japanese sword from master bladesmith Masamune in 150 years

  • by Casey Baseel

Should you visit a history museum in Japan, and, like I do, make an immediate beeline for the collections of samurai armor and weaponry, you might be surprised to notice that Japanese swords are customarily displayed with the stitching removed from the hilt. Visually, it sort of dampens the impact, since the remaining skinny slab of metal is a lot less evocative of it actually being gripped and wielded by one of Japan’s warriors of ages past.

The reason this is done, though, is because many Japanese swordsmiths would “sign” their works by etching their names into the metal of the hilt. Some craftsmen achieved almost legendary status, becoming folk heroes whose names are widely known even today.

The most respected of all, though, was Masamune, whose reluctance to sign his blades has made identifying them difficult. But difficult and impossible are two different things, and for the first time in over a century, a sword has been confirmed by historians as being the creation of the master himself.

Masamune was active during the late 13th and early 14th centuries, the part of Japan that today is part of Kanagawa Prefecture. He lived his life during the Kamakura Period, when the samurai class saw the most dramatic rise in its power over Japan.

Producing the highest-quality blades during a time of military power made Masamune’s swords extremely prized. Today, the only swordsmith who can approach his exalted historical status is Muramasa, who was born hundreds of years later. Justified or not, Muramasa is said to have been psychologically imbalanced and prone to violence. Superstition holds that these traits were passed on to the swords he forged, and as such Masamune’s are often held to be the superior weapons.

However, it can be hard to keep track of weapons in a country that’s gone through as many civil wars, revolutions, and occupations as Japan has, no matter how impressive their pedigree. Last year, a man brought a sword, which had found its way into his personal property, to the Kyoto National Museum to be appraised. Historian and sword scholar Taeko Watanabe spent the months between then and now studying the blade, and has recently announce her conclusion that it is a Masamune.

"Judging from its unique characteristics such as the pattern that can be seen in the side of the blade… it was unmistakably forged by Masamune."

The particular sword, which Watanabe says is called the Shimazu Masamune, had been given in 1862 by Iemochi, the 14th Tokugawa shogun, to the Imperial Family to mark his marriage to Princess Kazunomiya, also known as Princess Kazu.

"By presenting such a masterwork to the Imperial Family, Iemochi showed the deepest appreciation and highest respect," Watanabe commented.

Following this, the sword’s whereabouts were unknown until its anonymous owner brought it to the museum in Kyoto. It is the first blade to be confirmed as a Masamune in roughly 150 years.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Rocket News 24

(via teadrunktailor)